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More of my trip to Egypt

More of my trip to Egypt

Luxor East bank Internet cafes here are quite expensive here, $2 per hour! So needless to say I don’t go to them every single day. There is a coffee shop that has wifi supposedly, but I haven’t tried that out yet since it’s full of nothing but Egyptian men who are unemployed and with no lives.... in other words they will all try to talk to me and get dates or married . I went back to the restaurant closest to my hotel again to give it another chance, since they have lunch specials that aren’t too terribly expensive. They use enough salt in their food for 10 meals, but besides that the curry chicken was alright. Now the Egyptian ice cream on the otherhand was just awesome. It is so much creamier then the ice cream in north America. The best part of lunch however was talking with the manager, or at least I thought she was... she is actually married to the owner. She is a British woman, who is quite friendly. I think she was just thrilled to find another woman she could talk with, in English especially. She said she hasn’t learned many Arabic words, and she wears her hair down, so I know she’s not Muslim. Egyptian hospitality strikes again.... after talking with her for awhile she invited me over to her mother in law’s place for dinner! The really neat thing about this is that her mother in law lives in the village, so I will be visiting Egyptian people living as most Egyptians live, and will be able to have some real Egyptian food (yum!). We are going to take the local transit to get there, which sounds like a lot of fun, and a bit of an adventure. It is 5cents to take the bus lol. From the bus stop you just walk over to the village. I asked what I should bring along, and she suggested fruit. I have heard more then one person mention fruit as far as what to bring when invited for dinner at an Egyptian person’s house. I just spent most of the day relaxing today, since I enjoy just doing nothing every once in awhile. I am fortunate enough to have candles, charcoals and incense now, so I can do some proper magic :). I also have some magical ink which will come in extremely handy. I’m not so sure where I can find parchment around here though without people really wondering! I have already had people asking over a dozen questions just about my request for candles! Apparently Egyptians just don’t burn candles very often. Candles are pretty much only used for romantic times, which I hear don’t happen very often (perhaps this would explain the desperate attitude of many of the men here). So needless to say everyone thought it was quite odd I wanted candles, and I’m sure even odder when I asked for 30 candles lol. They are all also starting to wonder why I want to spend a month in Luxor, as this isn’t standard tourist behaviour. Well I can’t help it if most tourists are lamers that only spend 2 days here! I’ve noticed something interesting in Egypt; the more time I spend here, the lower the prices get. I’m not exactly sure why this would be. These are stores I walk into for the first time and don’t even haggle, and I am now getting lower prices then when I first got to Egypt. I’m not even more tanned then say someone who is from California yet. I have to definitely say it’s quite nice though, and helps with the budget. Of course I know the locals still pay half to one-fifth of what I do, but my income is also higher then most of the locals. Some only make in an entire day what I make in an hour. Even though this is a very poor country (from what the locals tell me) they definitely do have some luxuries. With many of the jobs the staff do get to laze around a lot. I don’t see the western attitude of always work faster and look busy. Of course I’m sure it’s different for the factory workers, but I mean anyone I see working with the public, or when I see people farming. One of my favourite luxuries about Egypt is the fresh squeezed juice! There is nothing in the world like a nice glass or two of fresh squeezed guava juice in the middle of a hot day! Paying 50cents for a large glass isn’t too bad either lol. At home I generally can’t afford fresh squeezed juice from the coffee shops more then a couple of times a week if I want to stick to any sort of budget, since it’s $5 for a large glass. The fresh fruit stands all over the place are nice as well. The fruit is picked from the trees fresh daily, not shipped in from somewhere warmer while still green, then sprayed with a chemical to make them ripen faster (like in many places in north America). It really is too bad I won’t be here when mangos come into season! Another luxury the Egyptians have is lots of good food. Even those who are pretty poor manage to eat quite well, since it is all cooked at home. Those who don’t cook at home eat a lot of takeout kahsari I guess :>. Posted by A magicians travels at 2:58 AM No comments: Saturday, May 10, 2008 A long day of pretty little towns and police convoys I got up nice and early to get breakfast and my laundry back. Well all of the hotel staff were fast asleep so neither happened. However I did find one of my t-shirts by doing a thorough search of the closed off areas of the hotel, unfortunately I have no idea where they hid my shorts. The tshirts were on the clothesline. I spent the morning laying in the hammock on the roof reading up on the temples I would be visiting for the day. Fortunately I had handwashed my dress the night before, not trusting in hotel staff reliability, so I had something to wear. My driver and guide were on time, which in Egypt is close to a miracle. Fortunately we did have time to stop by the bakery to rectify the lack of breakfast problem on the part of the hotel. Damn the bakeries are good here! They have these things that are halfway between muffins and cupcakes. It was at this point that I started to notice the prices were about 1/5th the price with my guide present.... So first up, was a three hour drive to the temple at Abydos. We went to the furthest temple first so that we could time seeing them both with the police convoys. The drive along the Nile in parts, and the little tiny villages was amazing! There are still mud brick houses, and still many people who farm without any machinery. The Egyptian countryside is also just gorgeous! It is so nice to see after seeing nothing but cities for a large part of the trip. The annoying part of the police convoy is that you can’t stop at any of these little villages if you like, you have to keep going with the convoy. Of all of the temples I have seen before I have to say Abydos is by far the one with the best artwork. Of course they all have impeccable engravings done by the most amazing artists (especially considering that they etched all of this right into the walls), but in Abydos it is as if they had extra talented artists, and put a lot more detail into the drawings. There are finer lines, far more intricacy, and just done overall even better then any other temple. The other nice part of Abydos is that a lot of the colour is still intact in the drawings. At the Abydos temple, I was lucky and my guide talked the guard into unlocking the door to see the room where they used to slaughter the sacred animals for the offerings for the Gods of the temple. This room seemed to have the most feel, and I think it is because it’s just not walked through all day everyday like all of the other rooms. There were rooms sacred to about 7 Deities in this temple, which isn’t many of the total 741 Deities throughout Egyptian history. However 7 is more then usual for a temple. There are usually rooms sacred to only 3-4 Deities. Amon-Ra, Horus, Isis, Hathor, Nepthys, Osiris and Min (if I am remembering correctly). In each of the rooms they show the priest preparing the Deity statues, offering incense, redressing the statues, purifying them, laying out the offerings and so on. This is likely one of the temples where they got the most information about the temple practices in ancient Egypt. There is also the Osireon, which is *the* place to go after you die! Apparently this is where Osiris’ head is buried, and the Osireon is the place you try to have your tomb near, or at least make the journey here after you die, and this will bring you to a pleasant afterlife. Oftentimes people would also make a pilgrimage during their life to see the place. It is 3/4 submerged under water today due to the raising water level of the Nile, but it is still pretty neat to look at, and you can walk partway into it still. We also saw the sanatorium which was the healing place used in ancient Egypt. Apparently people used to make pilgrimages here for healing. Some of the famous medical papyri was from this area from what I understand. My guide told me a couple of healing methods they used to use, one involved putting garlic on the woman’s womb to see if she would give birth or not. If her breath then smelled of garlic, then she would indeed give birth (was pregnant). They were also able to tell if the baby would be a boy or a girl. They would put the urine of the woman onto a frog. If the frog got sick and died it would be a girl (nice omen lol), and if the frog lived and was healthy it would be a boy. At the Dendara temple I lucked out... I was looking at the Isis temple off to the side for awhile and was taking photos when the guard asked if I wanted in to see it. This temple is actually closed to the public presently. It was a two room temple, and was quite pretty, with very nice engravings. It also had a very nice feel to it. The guard insisted he put his arm around me for the photo (see the photos for more details), but it was a first, he didn’t try to flirt!!! I was impressed. On the property were also two wells which were used by the king and high priest for ritual bathing before entering into the temple. They bathed three times per day before going in for prayer and etc., sunrise, noon, and sunset. I feel like such the slacker with my ritual baths LOL. There was also a birthhouse, of Horus. Isis was Horus’ mother, however Hathor was his wetnurse and nanny, and later became his wife (long story I guess). Apparently Horus was fed by seven different Hathors for seven days in there somewhere. There were also the remains of a pretty old Coptic Christian church. We then next went to the main temple. There are the prettiest square pillars out front instead of the standard round sort, and each pillar has the Hathor head on the top of it. Also, the Hathor temple of Dendera is a lot of fun due to the many areas you can see and actually get to. With most temples you cannot see the roof or the crypts, sometimes even no amount of baksheesh will solve this either. However in this temple, there are over a dozen crypts under the temple (and at least one outside the temple), and they actually let you go down into the one inside the temple which is the largest and has the best images. They also let you go up onto the roof of the temple, which as a sacred place for Osiris where they believe one of his feet is buried. The crypt was amazingly well decorated, and had some awesome images that I just hadn’t s een before in a temple. With the temples there are usually common themes and main images, however these images had some subtle differences which was interesting. You had to carefully crawl down a set of stairs, then under a very low section to get in, but it was more then worth it. With the roof there is an extremely long stairway up to the top, and of course awesome artwork all of the way up. This is the place where the sacred barge comes in for the beautiful meeting between Hathor and Horus once per year. The ancient Egyptians would bring the barge from Dendara to Edfu once per year, and vice versa to meet. I can see why it was only once per year, since Dendara and Edfu are quite a distance from each other! Only once per year isn’t very often for a married couple lol. Perhaps this is why only four sons of Horus are mentioned *g*. Inside of the temple the most interesting non-standard bits were all of the zodiacal images. There was the wheel of the zodiac, the zodiac calendar, which was taken out of the temple and put in the Louvre museum in France, so a replica is now sitting in the temple in ancient Egypt (what the hell?) There are also drawing of all twelve of the astrological signs along the ceiling of this temple, in full colour. Some of the other common ceiling designs for this temple were those of Nuit, who was wrapped around, and about to swallow the sun. Afterwards my guide invited me over to her house for dinner, right after she helped me to find a place that sold candles. It only took three tries to find a store that sold them, one of the very same stores that I had checked the night before, but my guide knew the Egyptian word for candle which obviously helped a great deal LOL. The candles were 75 cents per pack of 10. I was even more convinced that prices are a lot less around my guide. We then picked up the to go Kashiri, which is apparently quite popular amongst Egyptians... and I found out that the locals don’t pay $1.50 for theirs, but they pay a lot less. She bought, no matter how much I insisted otherwise. At her place, N. Fried up some chicken, spicey Egyptian style, and served up the Kashiri. It was a nice change from the not so good Egyptian restaurants in the area. On a side note the guys at my hotel told me why Egyptian restaurants aren’t as good as home cooking here... at home the women cook (same with at the hotel for the staff) but in restaurants it is always the guys cooking. Well guys never learn to cook in Egypt, so needless to say the restaurants aren’t usually spectacular (just sometimes). We then chatted for a few hours, regular girl talk about guys, politics (their govt. Is as bad as Bush, and the US has their hand in stuff over here far too much), food, and we compared the cost of living here and in the US. I also got to meet her roommates who were extremely nice. It’s sort of funny, once the women took off their outdoor street clothes, the clothing that they wore around the house is more like what people in North America wear out of the house. However they are all Muslim, so they must keep their head covered, nothing tight, no sleeveless tops etc. Then she walked me back home so I wouldn’t get lost on the way. Fortunately she only lives 2 blocks from my hotel (hey it was dark and the streets are twisty). Posted by A magicians travels at 12:07 PM No comments: Friday, May 9, 2008 I'm getting too old for this... I spent half of the day searching for candles. I figured there has to be candles in Egypt somewhere, and one of the hotel staff says that I can find candles anywhere. Well apparently anywhere accept for the 20-30 stores that I asked at LOL. I did get to haggle up some indigo though, very good quality indigo, unlike that found in Aswan. However this wasn’t a tourist market so I think that helped. I could only get the guy down to $5 per lb though. He also offered me candles, but I didn’t like the price of $2 for 10 little ones. For dinner I had kashiri, an Egyptian takeout dish which is basically rice, pasta, seasoning, and I think a tiny bit of meat and tomato sauce. A huge dinner for $1.50 is always good, and the food tasted better then the restaurant I tried the other night. I then got back to my hotel complaining to the staff about how I couldn’t find any candles, so one of the staff offered to take me to find some in an hour, I agreed thinking this was a nice offer... Meanwhile, we went on his motorbike! If you recall my mentions about driving in Egypt in previous posts, you can see why I was more then a bit nervous. Also, you take something small like a motorbike, and for some reason the driver thinks he can go around anything, and the most narrow of places. Fortunately it wasn’t *too* stressful. So we finally find a store that sells candles. The guy told me 18LE ($3) for a pack of 3 and a candle holder! Talking about highway robbery! The guy that took me told me I would get the Egyptian price, bullshit. I think the guy that took me got a hefty percentage from the sale :P. Then he talked me into going out for a drink. I insisted that I don’t drink alcohol, so we went out for a juice. I told him about my husband and my two sons so he didn’t get any ideas. He wasn’t as talkative after that. I did get back to the hotel no problem though. I again did another search for candles to no avail, and had planned to go back to the $2 for 10 guy. I went to sleep nice and early since I was meeting my driver and guide at 7:30 in the morning, and by now you know how long things like breakfast take in Egypt. Later I had asked my guide why it was so difficult to find candles in Egypt. She said nobody uses them! She went on to say that they are only used during romantic times, and that isn’t very often LOL. It might have also helped if I had known the Egyptian word for “candle”. Posted by A magicians travels at 4:54 AM No comments: Thursday, May 8, 2008 My last day in Edfu I got up at 6am, which is always difficult, to make sure I was downstairs for breakfast at 7, so I would be ready to meet my driver at 8am. Any meal in Egypt always takes an hour, so I have learned to plan for it. Well 8am rolled around and no driver... 8:30... Finally the hotel owner got one of his sons who owned a cel phone to let me borrow it so I could call my guide. He said something about how he would find out. By 9am the hotel owner phoned my guide and started yelling at him for the lame service lol, or I figure that is what the angry and loud Arabic meant. So we come to find out that my driver won’t be by until 11am. So I decided to head for one last trip over to the Edfu temple. There isn’t much else to do in Edfu, and I just love visiting the temple. This time was a visit without my camera, so I just concentrated on the hieroglyphics and wall images. It’s amazing how every single time I go to that temple, I find something new I had never seen before. I always get a new idea for offerings to Horus, or learn something new about ancient Egyptian ritual. I only visited for about an hour before the hot sun got to be too much. I took the carriage back to the hotel, had yet another shower and waited for the driver. I gave the hotel manager a $20 US tip, which he told me was too much. I then said I was going to give his assistant a tip, and he said no, he will just give him 10LE (which is about $2 US). I thought that just wasn’t right since the assistant did just as much work, and helped me just as much as the owner. The assistant is the one who went out to buy me food whenever I wanted (at Egyptian prices), brought me food when I wasn’t feeling well, walked me over to the post office when I asked where it was etc. So I gave him a $20 US as well. He thanked me..... then I think later looked at how much. He thanked me at least 100 times LOL. I don’t think he gets paid that much (if at all), and he was very thrilled. He told me he was going to use the money to feed his sister who is currently pregnant. I don’t think anyone had ever tipped him before or something judging by his reaction. Well my driver and guide finally arrived, so I was off to Luxor. We first had to stop at the Edfu temple to get in line for the police convoy. I didn’t have quite enough time to go into the temple yet again though, so I just went to the market there. I bought a dress with gold Egyptian designs all over it for $10. The price started at about $90, and it was a hell of a lot of work to get him down to $10 LOL. Fortunately I was in a good mood, so I was just laughing about it. I have learned to not even bother haggling when I’m in a bad mood, or with someone I don’t like. From what I have learned, I paid waaaay too much for the souvenirs while in Cairo. Some of the guidebooks said to talk them down to half of what they say. I would say more like talk them down to 1/4 or 1/5th of what they originally quote! It also helps to not care at all whether you get the item or not. I have only once ever had a seller say he wouldn’t sell me something for a price I gave, so I had to offer a little more when I walked back through. Along the “highway” (which was a 2 lane road) we passed several tiny villages along the Nile. They were quite nice, and they look like an extremely relaxing place to live. While most of Egypt is desert, the bits along the Nile, and the bits along the irrigation canals are full of vegetation and are quite green. There are also many mango trees. Mangos aren’t in season for another 2 months though I’m told. On the way the convoy all stopped at a couple of overpriced cafeterias, and I paid as much for an ice cream bar as I have for a tshirt! I think the ice cream was a better value considering the heat though! I have to say those people are making a killing off the convoys. Once we arrived in Luxor my driver had no idea where my hotel was and had to ask several people. I also pointed out where on my map which helped a bit. We finally found it. The hotel was down what looked to me like a back alley, but it couldn’t have been since the street had a street sign with a name on it. Apparently not all streets are paved in Egypt. The hotel exceeded my expectations by far! For only $5 US per night I was amazed! It’s an extremely nice hotel. It also has very funky decor which is Bob Marley and Marijuana themed LOL. I’ll bet you can get the extra special hooka/sheesha smoke here. The staff are also very mellow and laid back which is nice. The best part of the hotel is their rooftop. It is a bunch of pillows, rugs, a hammock, a couple of daybeds, some chairs etc. all laid about, with some sort of reed rooftop over the entire thing. There are of course Bob Marley posters everywhere, and much pot leaf and Bob Marley art all over the walls. This is also where they serve breakfast. It doesn’t get much more relaxing then this, unless you count the felucca trips perhaps. For some reason or another, they have strung several beer cans up on the roof, I think to act as wind chimes of some odd sort. I also noticed a blue flowering morning glory plant up here, along with some other shrubbery that I can’t identify. It is an awfully nice place to sit and update my blog from :). Since it is the low season for tourists, I seem to have the entire roof garden to myself which is also nice. I asked which restaurant nearby was good, and they recommended the one at the end of the block. It had the best calamari I have ever tasted, which was also the freshest. They don’t use crappy old previously frozen squid like in North America. However the tageen was terrible! The worst tageen dish in all of Egypt I think. Since dinner cost $13 including an appetizer and a drink, I don’t think I’ll be returning to there again unless I’m particularly desperate. It’s sort of difficult to tell around here which places serve food, and which just serve coffee and sheeshas. Most seems to just do the coffee and sheeshas, since Egyptians are far better cooks then the restaurants anyways. The hotel staff keep asking me where I am going today, or what I am doing today. Apparently no tourists just take days off in Egypt. They all figure that I must be going on some tour or another, or going to some museum. Instead I am just relaxing and getting some reading and typing done. Posted by A magicians travels at 12:05 AM No comments: Monday, May 5, 2008 Last day at Edfu temple Well today was my last day at Edfu temple, and I have to say I’ll miss it :(. I went early in the morning since I was antsy to go due to not going yesterday. I spent 3 hours there today. During the first part there were a few tour groups, but after awhile it was again mostly empty, the way I like it. I was taking photos in the laboratory again (one of my favourite rooms), and a tour group came in. The guide was telling everyone that this particular room was very important because this is where they kept all of the important and legal documents. He then pointed out a cartouche to everyone. After the guide was out of earshot I told the group he was lying that this was the perfume room LOL. It’s pretty pathetic when someone calls themselves a guide and leads groups and hasn’t even read a single book on the temple they are giving tours of. I also figure this wasn’t just a guide hired right outside the temple since the group consisted of over 10 people that didn’t look like they knew each other.At one point I borrowed one of the policeman’s chairs and had him come with me so I could take some photos of the higher up hieroglyphics and designs. It was frustrating that I was only getting less then half of the entire wall since it went up so high. At least with the chair I got another row of bricks. The guard looked at the 20LE I handed him like it wasn’t that much. $5 US for 5 minutes of chair rental was pretty good I thought, and perhaps half his daily salary. I went into every room and did a Horus chant, which brought about a lot of presence in some of the rooms, and less presence in others. I also spent some time in the Mammasi and said hello to Hathor. When I left I was sad to go and knew I would miss the temple, but at least I will see a few more before I leave Egypt.All I did was walk downstairs this evening, and apparently the hotel staff didn’t think I ate enough for breakfast this morning (I wasn’t as hungry as usual) and asked me if I would like some food. Well the food last night was so good, and I was hungry so I said yes. I thought they were thinking a light meal like last night. Meanwhile I come to find out they laid out a huge dinner for me! Fried fish, soup, the yummy potato/tomato dish, flavoured rice, some vegetables and bread. I couldn’t finish it. Then the manger has a few cantaloupes brought in for me! I was only able to eat one of them, as I was so stuffed already. The manager said something about this being “lunch”, then said something about dinner. I assured him that I definitely would not be eating dinner later LOL. I would wonder if Egyptians eat this way all the time, but I can’t imagine so as they are mostly all so thin! I asked the manager if he eats this much usually and he said yes. One of his sons also told me that Egyptians in general tend to eat food and drink tea all day long. Well I leave tomorrow morning, so one more huge meal at most, then back to restaurant food which isn’t nearly as good and is much smaller in size (which is a good thing at this point I think). Posted by A magicians travels at 2:06 AM No comments: Sunday, May 4, 2008 Egyptian Hospitality I wasn’t feeling very well last night and today due to eating far too much kofta (which had perhaps sat in the sun too long) and so on. So in the morning when I didn’t show up for breakfast, the staff got quite worried. They came knocking at my door and I told them no breakfast. It took a lot of convincing, since they seem to think the more food more often the better LOL. The amazing part is how very thin they all are. Well a few hours later the main staff member came to check on me again to make sure I was OK, and check to see if I wanted any food yet. Then a few hours later the manager came up having heard that I was ill, and wanted to make sure I was OK and wanted to know if I wanted food yet. Well I finally made it all the way downstairs at about 6pm, asking if I could please have a piece of bread. I couldn’t think of much else that I could actually eat and not feel worse. So the staff just laughed and came back with a couple of pieces of bread... and I should have known he was up to something by his laugh, a bowl of potato soup and some mint tea. When I was nearly done my first bowl of soup he grabbed it and got me another, same with the second bowl... the third bowl came filled with rice as well as the soup. I have to say the tomato based potato soup was one of the best flavoured meals I have had in Egypt so far. I was basing everything on the restaurants here, but I have to say the home cooking is 100 times better. Well I guess it’s the same as in Canada, most restaurant food isn’t nearly as good as what you can make at home if you spend more then 10 minutes at it. I figure this is what people must mean when they talk about Egyptian hospitality. This is a much better image of such things then the obligatory cup of tea at the papyrus, perfume and rug shops (and any other shop that can talk you into it). It’s a good thing I was only mildly ill, and couldn’t eat, I think they would have all worried sick otherwise, or if I was down for more then half a day! I do have to say the early morning knocking at my door can be annoying, especially that first morning when they somehow got the idea I wanted a 6am wakeup call, but all it all the service and attention is much nicer then the other hotels. Even with the other hotels though, they do seem to take an interest in helping out, such as preparing an early breakfast at 3am on the day I was leaving for a trip at that hour, recommending the best eating places complete with hand drawn maps, and so on. After eating all I could tonight that they had served me, I went upstairs with a couple of pieces of bread telling them that I was going to sleep some more. Well they had asked if I wanted some cantaloupe earlier, and I said no thank you since I was more then full. Well about 5 minutes after I settled in in my room there was a knock at the door, and there was the main staff member standing there with a cantaloupe on a plate for me. The cantaloupes here are pretty neat, they are only the size of a large orange (this time of year), and are really sweet and actually taste better then the regular ones I’m used to. They aren’t orange inside either, they are green. I’m guessing when they get larger, they taste more like what I know as a cantaloupe. I was sort of wondering when I kept seeing fruit stands full of what looked like mini versions of cantaloupes. It’s a good thing I’m not staying long at this hotel or I would need to buy a new (larger) set of clothing! I unfortunately didn’t get to the temple today since I wasn’t sure if I felt like the 10 minute walk each way, or dealing with one of the carriage drivers. Not a problem, I still have tomorrow to get photos of the last few hieroglyphics I may have missed, and get a little more meditation at the temple in. It is likely that all of the guards will wonder why I took a day off though lol. It was a nice and relaxing day where I got some of my work done, and organized my photos into a longer and nicer version of these blogs. I’m thinking of PDFing it. I have found Horus’ presence to much stronger each day that I visit the temple and stay near the temple, which has been nice, and I will definitely miss visiting the temple daily. Anytime I wasn’t feeling my best and went to the temple I would feel so much better afterwards. I’m figuring it is a healing temple, as well as that one in Kom Ombo. Posted by A magicians travels at 7:11 AM No comments: Saturday, April 19, 2008 The Edfu temple yet some more Upon my return there today, the guard who I had paid to get up to the roof was very happy to see me, and was telling me about the really nice views from the other side of the roof and suggesting that I could perhaps go up there as well lol. I wasn’t sure if it meant another climb up, or via the actual stairs this time though... so I decided to pass at least for now.There was one guide leading a group through the temple who was quite good. He spent about 10 minutes on the perfume room, and even gave descriptions of how some of the perfumes were made. Much better then the half assed guide that I had had the day before. I really should have gotten his name/number. The only problem was that he didn’t speak English very well, or so he said. He still spoke much better English then my guide had. According to the people in his group, he was also an archaeologist, so no wonder he did a better tour. I think it’s one guide who went to university just to get a good paying job, versus the other one who actually has a keen interest in the topic.My guide insists that no one needs more then a day at the Edfu temple, which obviously shows his lack of interest as well as knowledge about temples. There have been some groups over the years who spent months or years at that particular temple, going back daily. Apparently I am quite an anomaly here since no one ever spends more then a day in Edfu (2 at most), then they leave. No one ever goes to the Edfu temple more then once either apparently. While there is much to the temple, there isn’t all that much to do in Edfu really.... one can rent a bike, or take a horse drawn carriage around and go look at the town ruins, head over to El-Kab, and that is about it. Apparently there is also some street entertainment some nights near here. I didn’t get to see it, but I’m guessing it would be the stick dancing that seems ever popular in Egypt. Stick dancing is basically a PA out on the street, with several men doing a slightly intricate dance with large poles, dancing around and between them. It is interesting... for about 10 minutes.To get into the Edfu temple you have to walk for a few minutes past several booths of people selling stuff through this gated off area. However watching the locals I quickly learned that you can just hop over the short fence in one area and get right to the ticket booth. Needless to say this pisses off the overly persistent sellers. At least they all seem desperate enough that is I wanted another $2 t-shirt I could most likely acquire one. Usually by the time I get to the temple all of the little tiny shops/stalls are all closed though since most of the cruise ships and tour buses have already left for the day. There are some tour buses that come by an hour before closing to see the temple in the dark though. Edfu temple is just gorgeous after dark! Posted by A magicians travels at 7:22 AM No comments: Thursday at Edfu temple I took one of the horse drawn carriages down to the temple. It is only a 10 minute walk but they are hard to resist in the hot sun! However on the way back I chose to walk as it was much cooler then and the walk home was quite nice, and peaceful. Well that is peaceful accept for a couple of kids that saw me walking, and managed to run and go find a horse drawn carriage to try to talk me into riding LOL. They even offered me half of the usual fare. I just felt like walking though.The guards are all pretty amazed that I keep coming back everyday! For some reason everyone seems to think that the Edfu temple can be seen easily within a couple of hours. Obviously most people don’t take photos of every single scene and hieroglyphic they can *g*. Well that and most tourists are just that, tourists. They don’t see or care about the sacredness of the place and think it’s just a neat huge old building, so why would they need more then 2 hours? Apparently there isn’t a weekly discount though lol.I went into each of the room this time and did a small working in each one with the Deity of that room. It was quite an awesome experience, and the presences are strong here. Fortunately this temple out of all of them is the best for the guards leaving you alone to meditate or whatever you do. Some of the other temples they can get quite annoying! Again I went later in the day and had the entire building to myself most of the time. It was interesting to feel Horus’ presence strongly during the day. This time I also wandered around the outside of the entire temple, which is quite amazing. Basically 50 foot high engravings of Gods! There are also several displays around the temple grounds, such as pieces of the older version of the temple, pieces of other temples nearby, pieces of this temple that are in disrepair and so on. There are also a few random Roman statues, various altars and libation tables, and some wall blocks with various Deities on them, all displayed in various places on the temple grounds. I of course saw some interesting scenes and hieroglyphics that I had not seen before. Easy to miss I guess with a few million there. The good thing is that I seem to be able to understand the temple and hieroglyphics more and more each time I go. I’m also starting to understand the patterns of common designs and themes of the ancient Egyptian temples in general. Even with different Pharaohs, there are definitely some repeating scenes and hieroglyphics that you find in each temple, even the ones depicting the Pharaoh. Since the scenes are often the same or similar you definitely have to know how to tell which Pharaoh is which, or know ahead of time. Well of course you can always read his or her name above the image that is written in the cartouche. One interesting bit about the Edfu temple in general are the blank cartouches that you find around here and there. They made a few and left them blank so they could fill in the next King’s name, since they of course didn’t know who it would be yet. I think they would likely notice if I added my own name with a chisel and hammer though, darn.I went to sleep very early since I had to get up at 6am, and they damn prayers over the loudspeakers always wake me up at 3am. What in the hell are they thinking to have prayers over loudspeakers at 3am for? Apparently my guide isn’t Muslim as he says he has no problem sleeping through them and just puts a pillow over his head LOL. El Kab and Edfu temple with a guide.... or 5Apparently in Egypt when you hire a private guide, you get a few bonus ones as well. There is the guide of course, as well as the driver. When I was in Aswan, the travel agent would also come along, as well as one other person sometimes (no idea what he was there for). Well in Edfu, my guide had his friend as our driver, who was driving a neat old beatup Peugo that had enough room for 9 people! Good thing too... my guide decided to bring a friend along as well. Then when we got to the sites, the local security person would hop in the car with us as well. When I went to the tombs there were 4 people with me, 2 security, my guide, and my guide’s friend.So the first stop at El Kab is the four tombs. These are the four tombs that are open, but I know there are more as I have maps showing far more of them. That is one annoying thing about Egypt, a lot of the more remote temples and tombs tend to be closed. We walked up several stairs to get to the tombs which were cut right into the rock which was pretty neat. The designs within the tombs were just beautiful!! A lot of the colour was still there as well. Unfortunately I wasn’t allowed to take any photos inside of the tombs. On one side of the wall you would have scenes from during the life of the Pharaoh, then on the other side of the wall you would have the scenes in the afterlife. The one side of the wall would depict the great exploits, of the Pharaoh as well as the basic things he did such as farming (some had great farms). In the afterlife you would see much food, many slaves performing all of the duties for the King etc.I had read the guide book, and a few websites about El Kab, and I somehow got the impression that we were going to have to be hiking four kilometres each way across the desert to see everything. Needless to say I was quite thrilled when I found out we could drive to all of the sites! I don’t mind hiking and all, but not when it’s this hot out! Next time I come to Egypt, I’m thinking November or January might be a more appropriate month, as it’s much cooler and I will enjoy the sites even more.We next went to a dual temple of Nekbet and Hathor. The guide got many pathetic points when he said he didn’t know which Deities this temple was to, and guessed Horus and Osiris (since there were images of the Pharaoh making offerings to these two Deities, one on each side of the wall. I did ask who the woman was that the Pharaoh was making offerings to, and the guide said “his wife”. Btw, El Kab is one of the more remote places to go to, and not many guides even know it exists, so I went easy on him. Now here is the interesting bit, he walked outside, and I didn’t see him look at any notes or anything, but he suddenly came back in saying it is a temple to Nekbet. Considering the signs I think the invisibles that were traveling with me helped him out a bit. I later read in the book that it is for both her and Hathor. The Hathor face on the top of the columns helped to confirm this. Well a remote and unknown location so I thought until I saw two tour buses pull up! Fortunately they didn’t go past the tombs. Next up we drove to an area of rock in the middle of the desert a bit off the road, where there were ancient hieroglyphics and pre-Dynasty animals etched into the rock there. We got some bonus fun of being able to climb around on the rocks.Then we went to the main temple area where there were two temples. The first temple was very tiny and was only one room, but was still quite nice. This temple was dedicated to Horus, and had several depictions of him on the walls (of course).The larger temple was dedicated to Nekbet and Horus, and was the nicest one of the lot, with stone stairs going up to it, and it was in pretty good condition. The wall colouring and engravings were just gorgeous and much of the design and colour on the roof was still there. This was also a one room temple, but it was quite a large room. Outside of the temple in what was the Hypostyle hall, were the remains of quite a few pillars. There were also Hathor designs around the top of the walls. All three of these temples were of course MUCH smaller then most of the temples were are used to in Egypt, but still pretty interesting in their own right. The guards of the area found and gave me a souvenir from the area, what looked to be a piece of a pottery vase.My guide said the tour was now done, so I asked what about the town of El Kab. It seems that tour guides in general, from the best to the worst will leave a lot of things out unless you specifically ask. For example, a trip to El Kab really wouldn’t be complete without seeing the old town and the temple ruins there. My guide in Cairo tried to leave out some smaller pyramids, my guide on Phillae island tried to leave out the birth house... and well you get the idea. So we went to the main “highway” and parked on the side of the road, crossed over 3 train tracks, and walked about a kilometre down a dusty dirt road. We were walking along the outer wall of the town of El Kab. Then we entered through the side entranceway along the path. I was told by the friend of my guide to watch out for snakes, so I rolled my pantlegs back down LOL. There are actual poisonous snakes in Egypt afterall. After going a ways I realized that in one section, what I thought were ruins were actually people’s houses, and people were still living in El Kab! They were living in the middle of nowhere right on the edge of the Nile in a really pretty old town protected by a huge mud brick wall. It seemed about 10 times as hot in El Kab as anywhere else in Egypt and the hike was hard. The hike wasn’t physically hard but with the heat and NO shade within miles it got tiring fast. Even my guides, who were in their 20’s looked a bit tired by the end of it.We finally reached the ruins of the temple, and boy do I mean ruins. There weren’t even any walls left. Just a few remnants of pillars, what is left of the alter (which I was so tired I sat on it) made of black granite (my guide thinks basalt and black granite are the same rock :P), and some other bits and pieces here and there. Apparently it isn’t known who this temple was dedicated to since there isn’t really anything to go by. The archaeologists never did figure it out, and just left it in ruins. My guide found a bit of a clue, an etched in image of a Deity on a piece of old pillar. He said he guessed it is Horus.... right up until I pointed out that the figure had a breast...There was a picture that looked to be of a Pharaoh on another pillar remnant, but that was about it. The guess is that the temple was to Nekbet since the entire area was/is hers. She’s the Goddess of the dessert and etc.My guide had been quite nice and gotten some water and a huge bag of Egyptian snacks that we all had as breakfast. Fortunately I got back to my hotel in time to still enjoy the huge breakfast the place is famous for. Egyptian junk food just wouldn’t have sufficed for the day. I still can’t believe the size of the breakfasts around here, they are huge. Most hotels just give you a few pieces of bread, a tiny package of butter and one of jam, and a little triangle of cheese. Terrible. Well as described above the breakfasts here consist of far more then that. They are also the most nutritional food I have found in all of Egypt which is a nice change! After eating the breakfasts I don’t tend to get hungry again until about 8pm, then either have a small snack or just skip dinner. Lunch is right out of the question after one of these breakfasts! Actually I often need a nap after one of them! The owner/manager of the hotel actually serves you himself, and I mean fully serves you! He has the food brought out, then stuffs your pita like bread full of each ingredient for you. When you are about half done the first one, he’s already started the second... and so on. I have never made it past 3 so far, and doubt anyone who has stayed here ever has! This is even after I only have one apple during the first course. I have never gotten as far as the extra bread and jam either. I have met two of the owner’s wives now, a few of his son’s and talked with one of his daughter’s on the phone. He definitely has the treat you like family attitude here! So much so that he made my guide show him his ID, which they wrote the name down, and also they insisted on going outside with me and copying down the license plate number of the car that I would be traveling in. Since I booked with a well known and government approved travel agency I seriously doubt there would have been any problems... but I have to say even if I had booked with a not so good one, I doubt there would have been any problems after all this. Now my guide asks me to meet him outside the hotel since the owner asks him too many questions about himself, as well as tries to get more information about me LOL. I don’t think the owner likes my guide though, since he has told me several times to not give him my money. Perhaps a bad impression, or perhaps my guide is too modern looking/acting.After wandering through the hot desert and enough food for 3 people, relaxing under the fan on high was definitely in order. Fortunately my guide and I had agreed on 5pm for the Edfu temple, which was late enough it wouldn’t be too hot out and was 4 hours after breakfast.I was expecting my guide to pick me up with a driver, however he was expecting we would walk. I was a bit tired from the morning, so I insisted we take a carriage. He made me pay for the transportation. Needless to say his tip at the end of the day wasn’t huge. The tour was alright. It was only about half an hour long, and he pointed out a few things, walked by most of the rooms (but most of the other guides there do as well), and only covered a few scenes. He was only going to show me the final scene of Horus conquering Set, until I asked him where it started and ended, so he showed me the whole thing, without much explanation, which is actually good since hearing the 10th guide tell me the story would have been getting old. He walked right by the sacred main room twice, so I asked him to stop and explain that one to me. Talking about the mini tour. I had booked El Kab and Kom al Ahmar, and was told Al Ahmar was closed, which pissed me right off since that was the main reason I booked with this company and paid so much. So a pathetic tour of Edfu to make up for it just wasn’t enough.There was one definite highlight though. I asked my guide if he could please ask the guards about me seeing the roof. He kept insisting that the roof was closed and that no one was allowed up there. I told him that with enough baksheesh yes they are, I have been to the roofs of other temples, and I have read about other people going to the Edfu roof. Finally I talked him into asking. It was going to cost $5 for the guy who told us it’s OK and pointed out the route, and another $5 for the police. This was more expensive then I expected, but I decided still worth it. The other stories I read about people going onto the roof, well they went through the locked gate by the guard opening it. Well either they no longer have the key, or the guard with the key was on break. So we were shown the way up to the roof by climbing up what seemed to be a slightly dangerous route along the temple bricks LOL. I found out later that my guide definitely did *not* enjoy this part of the tour! We were only allowed to go to certain parts of the roof though because other areas of it weren’t as solid and stable as would have been safe. I still did get a few photos though. Apparently we also had to not make it obvious at all that we were on the roof, but stay sort of low and not talk too loudly. It was still worth the trip I think. Perhaps it was a good thing that we went during a time where there was no one else in the temple and most of the guards seemed to be on break.Due to lack of anyone ever having change in Egypt, I bought 5 large bottles of water on my way back to the hotel. The hotel staff are so nice here, the main employee carried my water for me upstairs. He told me that he has been working here for 20 years now! He does do every beck and call of the owner, so I hope he gets paid well. Tomorrow it’s back to the Horus temple, with a pair of binoculars to see the higher up hieroglyphics and a different guidebook that goes into more detail then either of the other two books I have about the temple. Posted by A magicians travels at 7:19 AM No comments: Tuesday, April 15, 2008 the horus temple in edfu This is by far the largest temple I have seen so far! It is HUGE! It is about twice as tall as the rest, as well as longer and wider. It is even larger then the Phillae temple. The only problem with this particular temple is it is FULL of fucking tour groups! They fill up entire rooms and it’s difficult to get any photos while they are in there. It also makes it difficult to move around the temple. Fortunately there are rooms they just don’t go in (from what I can tell so far) so needless to say I will be choosing these for meditation. I walked to the temple at 7am when it wasn’t too hot yet, but only stayed about an hour and a half before the tour groups drove me nuts, then I took a horse drawn carriage (the popular transportation option in this area) back to my hotel. I returned to the Horus temple again later in the day, about 5pm. I decided I wanted to take a carriage there, but someone with a donkey cart offered me a ride for only `1LE (25cents US) and it looked like more fun then the horse drawn carriages so I went for it :). I gave him and extra dollar at the end since the horse drawn carriages seem to cost about 10LE if you don’t haggle too long. On the way back late at night the driver of the horse drawn carriage kept telling me he wanted sex, I about did everything but told him to “fuck off” since well I did want to make it as far as my hotel, and the police officer had me pay him up front. The driver “tried” to keep going past my hotel even though I pointed it out, so I screamed “stop” and well that got the attention of all of the locals, so he stopped. I must learn the word for “lecherous pervert” in Arabic. It’s fortunate that Egyptian men seem easily intimidated if you yell at them, well most, aside from the one that threatened to beat me up in Cairo, but I mean more in the small towns. I have no idea what shy and timid women do in this country.The visit to the temple was a million times better in the evening! There were barely any tour groups! I could actually walk around and see everything! I’m definitely not going in the morning again, but will wait until about 3-4pm I think. I was actually able to stand in front of the altar and shrine for half an hour alone which was quite awesome. I even noticed the statue definitely move at one point as I was walking by later! For a moment I thought a person nearby must have moved, but I was the only person in the entire area. The temple has an extremely strong presence of Horus when the tourists go home and the sun starts to go down. I saw 3 tour buses heading there for 7pm for the last hour of the temple being open though, so perhaps the presence wanes a bit during that time. The more quiet the temple gets, the stronger the presence of Horus and the other Gods. The temple actually felt quite eerie after the sun went down, especially in the back rooms. I couldn’t hear a sound anywhere, it was extremely peaceful, but oddly eerie in some areas. Eerie in a very peaceful manner that is. The temple actually got so completely quiet at one point, I couldn’t hear a single person, and hadn’t seen anyone for about 10 minutes, and thought they perhaps closed the temple and missed chasing everyone out. It would have been pretty neat to spend the entire night in the temple, but when I walked over to the main court I saw some other people, darn! lolAt the Edfu temple there are several rooms dedicated to other Deities, such as Hathor (obviously she would get one), Osiris, Min, Ius, Ra and Khonsu. In the temple there is the library (very small compared with the other rooms actually), a room of mourning, several rooms for offerings, a laboratory, the cloth and inventory room, a secondary sacred room, the main very inner chamber (which only the king and head priest were allowed to enter) which has the statue, the hall of joy, the hall of where Horus overcame Set, the purification passageways, and the birth hall. Outside of the temple there is also a birth house.There are two rooms that have stairs which lead to the roof of the temple. I would definitely like to go up to see the roof, but was a bit too tired this evening to do so. The gates to the roof are locked, but I’m sure it’s something that a little baksheesh couldn’t solve. I hear the views are just gorgeous from up there. Over the centuries when the temple was getting covered with more and more sand, at first people were living in the temple (the homeless, they made it their home), and they were living in the main part of it. Then when the sand got high enough, they started to live on the roof of the temple. Unfortunately much of the excavation project of removing the sand from the temple also involved moving centuries worth of garbage. I do have to say though, the centuries of sand covering the temple definitely did preserve it wonderfully! I have not seen any other temples in Egypt that are even nearly as nicely preserved. Most of the hieroglyphics and images are fully intact. This is pretty amazing considering that the hieroglyphics are carved as if they were embossed, so they would be easier to become damaged. The temple is extremely high; I would say about 15 feet high in many of the rooms, and about 30 feet high for the outer walls, front pieces, pillars and so on. This makes it difficult to photograph many of the wall designs unfortunately. I don’t think the temple staff would take too kindly to me bringing a step ladder so I can see them better :>. I did bring a pair of binoculars, which I will be using tomorrow to make a careful study of the uppermost hieroglyphics. I will also be going through the temple at a more relaxed pace with more meditation. Posted by A magicians travels at 10:43 AM No comments: kom ombo and edfu I checked out of my hotel far too early and met my driver outside the hotel. The convoy starts at 8am, so we had to leave early. It was a really pretty ride about an hour long through various tiny Egyptian villages. It’s always amusing to see carts full of vegetables and the farmer sitting on top going along beside the cars on the main “highway”. You also see people walking and leading bulls or other animals. Considering the driving in Egypt I’m surprised any of these people survive lol. The Kom Ombo temple is a dual temple of both Horus and Sobek. In ancient times people would make pilgrimages to this temple to say overnight for healing. Well they don’t allow people to sleep overnight in the temple (and I doubt I would have had enough baksheesh to make it work anyways, so I only stayed there for 5 hours. Everyone else only stays an hour, then catches the next convoy either to Edfu or Aswan out of town. So I was fortunate enough to get the entire temple to myself for at least 3 hours. Well myself and a few annoying guards that were asking if I was married and trying to be my self appointed guide in exchange for money. The one guard told me he had a couple of wives and five children to feed. I was tempted to tell him it’s not my fault he didn’t use a condom (he had already been pestering me for hours at this point).Unfortunately most of the temples in Egypt are jam packed door to door with an insane amount of tourists in tour groups. It can get very annoying and take away from the experience of the temple, so to be able to go when there is no one else inside the temple is very nice. I had the guide give me the standard tour of the temple at first, which took about an hour (at most), but fortunately he did a very good job of it. I have to say it is quite awesome to have someone show you around the hieroglyphics and pictures in the temples and explain what each is about. On your own you can sort of guess, but still they do provide extra tidbits and lore that you may have missed, and that is not in the guidebooks.This particular temple had the new kingdom pillar tops which were both papyrus and lotus flowers combined, instead of just one or the other (so new kingdom). The hieroglyphics in this temple were outees, in otherwords they had to carve out the rest of the wall so that just the letters were left! Needless to say this particular temple took a few hundred years to build. The top half of the temple is missing in large areas due to damage and an earthquake. Even the 2 altars area heavily damaged due to the earthquake, Sobek’s more so then Horus’. Unfortunately more of the outer wall on the Horus side is damaged then the Sobek side, so you don’t get to learn as much about the offerings that are to be given to Horus. One of the neatest bits of the temple is the calendar for an entire year, complete with which offerings to give Horus and Sobek on each day. Along the outer wall you actually see pictures of penises with drops of sperm coming off of them to represent prosperity and life. Apparently the ancient Egyptians weren’t prudes. Since Horus and Sobek didn’t necessarily get along, the temple is divided into two exactly equal halves, with Ma’at watching over it to make sure all is just and fair. The halfway point is carved into the outer wall. In this particular temple Sobek has Hathor as a wife instead of Horus (who usually does), and apparently Sobek stole Hathor from Horus, so no wonder they don’t get along. One part of the temple is the Hathor chapel, which comes complete with the mummies of three crocodiles! They are all in glass cases. The ancient Egyptians used to mummify animals quite often, and for obvious reasons if you look at the Sobek temple example. In the Cairo museum every animal imaginable has been mummified. With all of those people who have their favourite pet stuffed after it dies, you would think some would prefer mummification *g*.Going around the temple taking photos, and meditating was extremely fun and relaxing (accept the when the annoying guard was pestering me). I saw on the Horus side more often, and was able to meditate off and on there for about an hour with no tourists, not too much guard interference and a decent amount of shade. Since the roof was missing in most places, the sun was quite bright and hot in the temple. In the afternoon when the sun had moved over to the other side of the sky a bit, I was able to get photos of the hieroglyphics on the other side of some of the walls.There was also a nilometer in the temple that was quite deep, and still to this day gets a little water from the nile in it. The temple is overlooking the nile (as most are). There is a mamassi, or birth house near the temple as well. This is standard for many of the Horus temples, an area that is said to be where Isis gives birth to Horus, often complete with inscriptions showing the details.One of the famous parts of this particular temple is the part where they show the ancient medical instruments, including those for mummification, birthing, and other medical practices. Some books say that they are more likely to be ancient ritual instruments, and not medical ones afterall. It’s difficult to tell, but I’m not sure how things like scissors and forceps would be part of a set of ritual tools.Off to the left is the ruins of the old temple. As with many of the temples now standing in Egypt, a newer temple was usually built on top of, or beside an old one. This was generally because the old one would be in too much disrepair or mostly covered in sand. It sure makes me wonder what the even older temples looked like. The ruins were interesting, and had a different style of hieroglyphics on them then I am used to seeing in other sites. I’m glad they have a habit of keeping every piece, since what can be inscribed into the ruins can be just as interesting as what is inside the temple.After I left the temple I went for a juice at the local cafe, an outdoor cafe with straw and reed roofing and walls, which were quite pretty. Unfortunately the fresh squeezed mango juice was a bit old. I was so hot and tired from a full day in the temple that I forgot to ask the price before I drank it, so when asking the guy quoted me $5 US. I looked at him like he had to be crazy, and he laughed and said “OK 6LE (US $1.25)” Perhaps they try their best to get one over on tourists who don’t know how much fresh squeezed mango juice goes for in Egypt. Even $1.25 is a little more then the usual going rate of $1 LOL.We left with the afternoon convoy into Edfu, and I checked into my hotel. According to all of the guide books there is only one hotel in Edfu, and according to most travel agents there aren’t any. So I stayed at the one. I would call it perhaps a 1 or 2 star hotel! The room was clean enough, and large, but the bathroom was scary, mostly due to the building being so old. There weren’t any insects in the room, and it smelled fine, so I stayed. The hotel manager is quite nice, and brought a huge plate of various fruit and some tea when I checked in. However with the manager if he ever gets you to sit down, an entire hour is usually gone talking with him, while he tries to fill you up with more tea and more fruit.Fortunately the hotel was able to supply me with a converter plug for my converter plug, since they have the older style, and my plug was for the newer style. The people at the travel store assured me I wouldn’t need the older style. Apparently they had never stayed in Edfu! It is a small farming town afterall, and needless to say there aren’t any internet cafes about. The manager is an extremely friendly person, and quite well known for this. He introduced me to his 3rd wife, since the other two had colds at the time. I also met a few of the other people in his family. Apparently he has 3 wives and FIFTEEN children!! I made a joke about how he’s nearly catching up with Ramses II, but I think it was lost in the language barrier.Now this hotel is famous for the large breakfasts... so when I got back from the Horus temple the next morning, I was brought a huge plate of fruit. I ate quite a bit of fruit and was disappointed that that’s all that there was, and I ate quite a bit so I wouldn’t be hungry until lunch. Oops, apparently that was just the breakfast appetizer ROFL. The actual breakfast came afterwards. I don’t think I have ever eaten so much breakfast in my life! The owner also likes to encourage you to eat more and more (I’m surprised his guests can fit through the door when they leave!) There was an egg dish much like a plain omelette that came in a heated cast iron pot, lots of bread, a huge plate of Egyptian cheese (much like feta) a bunch of buns and jam), fuul (fava beans), a tomato and cucumber salad and I forgot what else since I was so stuffed I couldn’t finish my 3rd serving, no matter how much the manger insisted LOL. I’ll be surprised if I’m hungry in time for dinner! Details on the temple of Edfu will be in the next post. Posted by A magicians travels at 10:42 AM No comments: the nubian museum I went without a guide to the Nubian museum, and perhaps a guide might have hel

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